HOME  |  CAMPAIGNS  |  WHY ME  |  TRADE  |  POS  |  LOGOS/LABELS  |  ADS  |  PHOTOS  |  SPECIAL  |  WRITING

DOUGLAS HOUGH, CREATIVE SERVICES  |   WINE

 

707.255.6123

BACK
TO TOP

BACK
TO TOP

WRITING

Round Hill

Wine Smart tips
of the month ...

Go nuts.

Walnuts have tannins just like red wines do. Which means sprinkling walnuts onto a dish will help it pair with red wine.

That’s Wine Smart!

Robert Parker of Wine Bargains named Round Hill
one of the “World’s Best Wine Values Under $25!”

Leafhoppers are hopping mad.

Sticky tape is an effective way we control destructive leafhopper pests in vineyards without using pesticides.

Round Hill

Wine Smart tips
of the month ...

Two words: roasted garlic.

Mix it with some softened butter and smear it onto
a just-cooked chicken breast, pork chop or steak.

1 bottle = 4 1/2 glasses.

When buying wine for a party, figure pouring
about 4 1/2 glasses per bottle.

The buzz on cover crops.

The cover crops we plant in our vineyards help control weeds and encourage healthy honey bee populations.

Round Hill

Wine Smart tips
of the month ...

Use your gourd.

‘Tis the season for pumpkin, but also pumpkin seeds. Sprinkle them in salads and soups, on sides and over baked goods.

Reds: the right temperature.

Red wine served too warm loses it’s flavor.
Around 65°f (18.5°c) is just about right.

Vineyard cop.

Perches in our vineyards attracts hawks, falcons and other raptors. They police rodents that might otherwise feed on grape vines.

ROUND HILL WINES (WEBSITE)

Concept, copy and design

Wines Worth Knowing.

RUTHERFORD RANCH (TAGLINE)

Napa Valley. To a Wine Grape, it’s Eden.

NAPA VALLEY VINTNERS (TAGLINE)

Round Hill is Wine Smart.

ROUND HILL WINES (TAGLINE)

Artfully Blended. Deliciously Splendid.

SPLENDID OAK CELLARS, VINTAGE WINE ESTATES (TAGLINE)

Match the movie with the wine quote

1: “I never drink wine.”
A: The African Queen. B: Dracula. C: Clean And Sober. D: Interview With A Vampire.

2: “I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti.”
A: Scream. B: Nightmare On Elm Street. C: Texas Chain Saw Massacre. D: Silence of the Lambs.

3: “Red wine with fish. Well, that should have told me something.”
A: Who Is Killing The Great Chefs Of Europe? B: From Russia With Love. C: The Freshman. D: All About Eve.

4: ”I’m drinking some wine, eating some cheese, and catching some rays, you know...?”
A: Cheech And Chong’s Next Movie. B: Catch 22. C: Kelly's Heroes. D: MASH.

5: “I like to drink wine more than I used to.”
A: The Godfather. B: Saturday Night Fever. C: A Walk In The Clouds. D: Moonstruck.

6: “Champagne’s funny stuff. I’m used to whiskey. Whiskey’s a slap on the back and Champagne’s heavy mist before my eyes.”
A: Sabrina. B: Philadelphia Story. C: It Happened One Night. D: Ninotchka.

7: “Champagne and Potato Chips! This is a wonderful party!”
A: The Seven Year Itch. B. The Apartment. C: The Fortune Cookie. D: Some Like It Hot.

8: “I never drink wine... ah, what the hell.”
A: Dirty Harry. B: Dracula: Dead and Loving It. C: Vampire in Brooklyn. D: Love At First Bite.

9: “I like to think about the life of wine. How it’s a living thing. I like to think about what was going on the year the grapes were growing; how the sun was shining; if it rained. I like to think about all the people who tended and picked the grapes. And if it’s an old wine, how many of them must be dead by now.”
A: My Dinner with Andre. B: Sideways. C: Babette’s Feast. D: Bottle Shock.

10: “Was 1 a good year?”
A: History Of The World, Part I. B: Monty Python’s Life Of Brian. C: A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum. D: One Million Years B.C.

Answers

1: ”I never drink wine.”
A: The African Queen. B: Dracula. C: Clean And Sober. D: Interview With A Vampire.
Answer: Count Dracula (Bela Lugosi) said it in “Dracula” (1931).

2: “I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti.”
A: Scream. B: Nightmare On Elm Street. C: Texas Chain Saw Massacre. D: Silence of the Lambs.
Answer: Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) said it in “Silence Of The Lambs (1991).”

3: “Red wine with fish. Well, that should have told me something.”
A: Who Is Killing The Great Chefs Of Europe? B: From Russia With Love. C: The Freshman. D: All About Eve.
James Bond (Sean Connery) said it in “From Russia with Love (1963).”

4: “I‘m drinking some wine, eating some cheese, and catching some rays, you know...?”
A: Cheech And Chong’s Next Movie. B: Catch 22. C: Kelly’s Heroes. D: MASH.
Oddball (Donald Sutherland) said it in ”Kelly’s Heroes (1970).”

5: “I like to drink wine more than I used to.”
A: The Godfather. B: Saturday Night Fever. C: A Walk In The Clouds. D: Moonstruck.
Answer: Don Corleone (Marlon Brando) said it in “The Godfather (1972).”

6: “Champagne’s funny stuff. I’m used to whiskey. Whiskey’s a slap on the back and champagne’s heavy mist before my eyes.”
A: Sabrina. B: Philadelphia Story. C: It Happened One Night. D: Ninotchka.
Macaulay Connor (James Stewart) said it in “Philadelphia Story (1940).”

7: “Champagne and Potato Chips! This is a wonderful party!”
A: The Seven Year Itch. B. The Apartment. C: The Fortune Cookie. D: Some Like It Hot.
Answer: The Girl (Marilyn Monroe) said it in “The Seven Year Itch (1955).”

8: “I never drink wine... ah, what the hell.”
A: Dirty Harry. B: Dracula: Dead and Loving It. C: Vampire in Brooklyn. D: Love At First Bite.
Count Dracula (Leslie Nielsen) said it in “Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995).”

9: “I like to think about the life of wine. How it’s a living thing. I like to think about what was going on the year the grapes were growing; how the sun was shining; if it rained. I like to think about all the people who tended and picked the grapes. And if it’s an old wine, how many of them must be dead by now.”
A: My Dinner with Andre. B: Sideways. C: Babette’s Feast. D: Lost in Translation.
Maya (Virginia Madsen) said it in “Sideways (2004).”

10: “Was 1 a good year?”
A: History Of The World, Part I. B: Monty Python’s Life Of Brian. C: A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum. D: One Million Years B.C.
Answer: Pseudolus (Zero Mostel) said it in “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966).”

Veuve Clicquot, Pahlmeyer, Château Lafite-Rothschild ...
some of the greatest names in wine are cast in the movies too.

Bottle Shock, 2008
Fictionalized account leading up to the famed 1976 “Judgment of Paris” blind winetasting in which California staged a major coup by upsetting their French counterparts. The outcome, which thrust Napa Valley and California winemaking onto the world stage, is over-shadowed by the multiple soap opera-type subplots of one winemaking family, namely Chateau Montelena and winemaker Jim Barret (Bill Pullman). Thank goodness Alan Rickman, as event organizer Steven Spurrier, is along for the ride to keep us engaged and interested. Worth seeing with the understanding that someday filmmakers will get the point of the story—and actual facts—right. Rated PG-13

Arsenic and Old Lace, 1944
It’s Halloween in Brooklyn. And newly-married Mortimer Brewster (Cary Grant) is anxious to depart for
his honeymoon with bride Elaine Harper (Priscilla Lane). But first he must contend with two aunts that
have buried eleven bodies in the cellar and the long-lost brother out to kill him, all while keeping it
secret from the police. Adapted from the stage play by film director Frank Capra and writer Julius Epstein (Casablanca), this is one of the funniest screwball comedies of all time. Do yourself a favor and pass on the elderberry wine—it tastes just deadly. Rated G.

Eating Raoul, 1983
This dark comedy directed by and starring Paul Bartel satirizes the loose and free-wheeling sexual revolution in Los Angeles of the early 1980’s. Wine store employee Paul Bland (Bartel) looses his job after ordering an expensive case of Château Lafite-Rothschild, risking a life-long dream shared by his wife (Mary Woronov) of owning a restaurant. Needing money, the two stumble upon an ingenious and dubious scheme to rob rich Hollywood “swingers” of their money, aided by locksmith/professional thief Raoul Mendoza (Robert Beltran). Rated R.

Blood and Wine, 1997
Gee, Alex (Jack Nicholson) ... maybe if you spent a little more time trying to make a go of your gorgeous little wine shop and less time chasing after Gabriela (Jennifer Lopez), you wouldn’t be so broke that you’d have to partner with sleazy Victor (Michael Caine) to steal that million-dollar diamond necklace. Maybe your wife (Judy Davis) wouldn’t have to beat the crap out of you. Maybe your step-son (Stephen Dorff) wouldn’t have to leave you broken, bruised and bleeding. Of course, maybe you wouldn’t have a plot either. It’s great fun watching as two masters—Nicholson and Caine—work together in this mildly violent and well-directed thriller. Rated R.

A Walk in the Clouds, 1995
Keanu Reeves stars in this gloriously photographed drama (shot at Peter Hayward’s Sonoma, California, ranch) about a Mexican winemaking family in post World War II United States. Reeves, as traveling salesman Paul Sutton, meets unmarried and pregnant Victoria Aragon (Aitana Sánchez-Gijón) who is returning home from college. Victoria fears what her “old-world” father (Anthony Quinn) will do upon learning of her pregnancy, so good Samaritan Paul agrees to temporarily pose as her husband while she confronts her dad. You know he’s going to fall in love with her, but there’s a catch—Paul is already married! Rated PG-13.

Babette’s Feast, 1987
“We had no bad intentions ... we had no idea where it might lead. And now we have exposed ourselves
to dangerous or, even maybe evil, powers.” Champagne and caviar, evil powers? It seems so to this small religious sect in 19th century Denmark, who agree to “lose all sense of taste” before a lavish French dinner celebrating the 100th birthday of their founder. That’s showing some gratitude to housekeeper Babette, the former head chef of the famed Café Anglais in Paris, who has offered to prepare the dinner and subsequently spends all her lottery winnings importing some of France’s greatest delicacies. Fortunately, copious amounts of Amontillado, Veuve Clicquot and Clos de Vougeot, coupled with Babette’s fabulous cuisine, help the parishioners not only to appreciate this wonderful effort but also mend a lifetime of petty grievances. Hallelujah! Rated G.

Philadelphia Story, 1940
Is Philadelphia society’s marriage event of the year in jeopardy? It seems so when tea-toddling Tracy
Lord (Katherine Hepburn) succumbs to bottles of Champagne on her wedding eve, setting off a chain reaction of plot twists in this sharply-written, sophisticated comedy. Will she marry her intended, or tabloid reporter Macaulay Connor (James Stewart), or someone else waiting in the wings?  A must view for fans of Hepburn, Stewart, and Cary Grant. Rated G.

Disclosure, 1994
Aided by a hard-to-find bottle of Chardonnay, Meredith (Demi Moore) seduces ex-lover and current underling Tom (Michael Douglas) in this drama about sexual harassment in the corporate world of high-tech. Things become complicated in the ensuing “he said/she said” harassment suit, especially since it puts a multi-million dollar merger deal at peril. Though Jayson Pahlmeyer’s '91 Chardonnay received minor billing as the wine, its casting none-the-less helped to catapult it to star status. Look for Donald Sutherland in a great supporting role. Rated R.

Year of the Comet, 1992
Charming yet disjointed romantic comedy about an extraordinarily rare comet vintage (1811) Château Lafite-Rothschild and its odd association with a secret biotech formula. Starring Penelope Ann Miller,
Tim Daly and Louis Jourdan (in his final film), Year of the Comet takes us from London and the Scottish Highlands to the Côte d’Azur while leaving banal dialogue and head-scratching scene segues in its
wake—not to mention some of the most boring chases ever filmed. Not exactly what one would expect from director Peter Yates (Bullitt, Breaking Away), you know? That said, there are worse ways to spend a rainy afternoon. Enjoy the beautiful cinematography and an endearing Ms. Miller. Rated PG-13.

Dumbo, 1940
Poor Dumbo. He’s been separated from his mother, spurned by his peers and humiliated by circus clowns. Just when it seems things can’t get any worse, a bottle of accidentally-consumed Champagne sends him into an inebriated evening filled with pink elephants. Is it really as bad as it seems, or can our little hero vindicate himself? Hey, it’s a Disney movie—what do you think? Rated G.

Sideways, 2004
A study of mid-life crisis as two long-time friends embark on a part bachelor party/part male bonding road trip to California’s Central Coast wine country. Paul Giamatti, as Miles, and Thomas Haden Church, as Jack, play their roles to perfection in this oenophile’s version of The Odd Couple. Oscar winner for best screenplay and a best picture nominee, Sideways did wonders for Santa Ynez Valley tourism and sales of Pinot Noir while sending sales of Merlot (“I’m not drinking any @#%&! Merlot”) into a tailspin. Look for Virginia Madsen and Sandra Oh in supporting roles. Rated R.

TIMEFORWINE.COM (WEBSITE)
Copy